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The Water Soluble Nitrogen and Phosphorus Balance for a Large Irrigation District

Carter, D.L. and Robbins, C.W. and Bondurant, J.A. (1970) The Water Soluble Nitrogen and Phosphorus Balance for a Large Irrigation District. pp. 49-56. In: Proc. 21st Ann. Pac. NW Fert. Conf. 1970/07/14-16. Pac. NW Plant Food Assn.

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Abstract

Concern for the quality of man's environment has caused widespread
speculation about how phorphorus and nitrogen fertilizers affect surface- and
ground-water quality. Charges that phosphorus is the key to algal blooms
and prolific aquatic plant growth and that NO?3-N in water is poisoning our
livestock, stimulating aquatic plant growth, and increasing the incidence of
methemoglobinemia -- commonly known as "blue baby" -- have become widespread (9,
11, 13, 16, 17, 18). The critical PO?-P concentration in water required to
support algal blooms has been reported to range from 0.02 to 0.05 ppm (9, 11,
13, 16, 18). Kuentzel (6) has recently suggested that carbon is more likely
the key to algal blooms, than is phorphorus. He points out that phosphorus
is needed for algal growth and reproduction, but that concentrations below
0.01 ppm are sufficient for algal blooms provided other factors are present
in adequate amounts. Nevertheless, it is popular opinion that phosphorus is
the key to algal blooms and that much of the phosphorus in our surface water
is derived from the application of phosphorus fertilizers.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
NWISRL Publication Number: 0210
Subjects: Mass Import - unclassified
Depositing User: Dan Stieneke
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2010 21:56
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2017 20:36
Item ID: 975
URI: https://eprints.nwisrl.ars.usda.gov/id/eprint/975